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  • Randall Fujimoto, a level 7 monster with 79 posts — 1 year, 7 months ago:

    Are you currently working on an educational ARG or interested in designing one? Please share your reasons for joining this group. Sorry if this overlaps some of the discussion in the “Activity” section, but it looks like Gameful is trying to move all discussion into individual forums (topics). So, to that end, please feel free to create any new topics you like to spur on discussion. Thanks for your participation!

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      Nance Cedar · 1 year ago· REPLY · Flag

      I’m a math teacher, who’s been continually frustrated at how boring math education is for the average student. I would love to help create a game that made learning math integral to reaching the goals of the game.

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        steve graham · 3 months, 2 weeks ago· REPLY · Flag

        There are a lot of games where math is integral. I expect the bigger challenge is finding a way to align whatever game to the curriculum requirements. I’ve always thought gambling games were very educational. At it’s simplest, just determining whether or not a particular die is fair can make an accessible, but interesting math question with a lot of depth. More generally, detecting cheaters makes for motivating problems. Or, in a similar vein, one could make a game of detecting abuses of mathematical/numerical information in popular media.

  • Avatar ImageMzo, a level 6 monster with 85 posts — 1 year, 7 months ago:

    I would love to work on an educational ARG. History seems like an amazing topic to apply ARG design to especially. Learning about dead people is much more interesting when you can “interact” with them!

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      Matt · 10 months, 3 weeks ago· REPLY · Flag

      History ARGs seems awesome to me, because I always had trouble with history in school. I was a good student, but the rote memorization required in history classes always bugged me and eluded my attention. One interesting phenomenon I noticed was that my friends who played history-based strategy games (like Age of Empires and the Total War series) were much more involved and interested in history class than I was, even though they were less successful students in other classes..

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        SuperAmanda · 7 months, 3 weeks ago· REPLY · Flag

        I see these posts are a tad old, but I thought I’d reply anyway. : ) The Assassin’s Creed series is an excellent example of an ARG that teaches history. I learned more from that game (AC2) about Renaissance Italy then I did in two semesters of college humanities. My daughter knew figures and architecture from the period that were brought up in her AP Art History class. When she told her Ph.D. teacher where she learned the info, her teacher scoffed….

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          steve graham · 3 months, 2 weeks ago· REPLY · Flag

          Recently listened to a podcast where the reviewer chose the Assassin’s Creed series as one of his all time top educational games. There is a rich mixture of art, architecture, and history embedded in them.

          One of his key points was the impact of the number of people playing it and the time they spent, in contrast to a hypothetical ”virtual tour” created with the intent to educate rather than entertain.

  • Avatar ImageDoug Powell, a level 7 monster with 11 posts — 1 year, 7 months ago:

    I am primarily looking for ways to introduce students to non-profits and social enterprises working in their city.

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      sparkle-tronica · 1 year, 7 months ago· REPLY · Flag

      Hi Doug,

      I am working on an ARG that introduces social activism in our city in my New Media Theory and Motion Graphics class. For one mission they have to envision how they would work with a non-profit for the next cycle of the ARG, and have the option of doing a day’s work with the non-profit as their solution to the ARG.

  • Avatar ImageSimon Brookes, a level 5 monster with 12 posts — 1 year, 7 months ago:

    Hi Doug

    I am about to start a project with Leeds University here in the UK to build a new taught unit which will be all about Social Enterprise. We will use the same framework that I did for my ARG-based unit. http://simonbrookes.wordpress.com/2010/09/15/authentic-learning-act...

    Happy to talk about this further with anyone.

    Simon

  • Avatar ImageMarcus Haberkorn, a level 3 monster with 2 posts — 1 year, 7 months ago:

    Hi Simon,
    that´s really interesting, I´m working on a project in at the University of Applied Sciences in Trier, Germany, that is quite similar. It is about creating an experience of entrepreneurship for design students and it´s arguing on the same premises as your presentation.
    We´re still undecided about the importance of leaderboards. I can see from your presentation that they were an integral part of your design and worked well.

    Marcus

  • Avatar ImageCayden Mak, a level 5 monster with 8 posts — 1 year, 7 months ago:

    Hey everyone,

    I just wrapped an ARGlike game for my city’s art biennial, Beyond/In Western New York. It was totally awesome, successful, and fun, and players learned about the art, as well as local architecture, history, and ecology. The website is still up here:http://playsharebeyondin.org.

    I’m interested in building stuff with more similar technology, as well as games more along the world-building/mystery-solving style of ARG to help people imagine and immerse themselves in alternative lives or political possibilities.

  • Avatar ImageColin, a level 2 monster with 2 posts — 1 year, 7 months ago:

    I think that is time for an alternate reality to evolve which could, if required, supplant reality as we know it. If;)

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      YESS! Tutoring · 7 months, 2 weeks ago· REPLY · Flag

      you should read some Baudrillard. He talks about how simulation inevitably does just that.

  • Avatar ImageRichard Olsen, a level 6 monster with 24 posts — 1 year, 7 months ago:

    Hi,
    Educational ARGs interest me because done well they could be an amazing learning experience for students. Ever since I started reading about them (never played one) I’ve tried to imagine how a good one would work. I’m convinced a browser base (via plugin) ARG could work and have been slowly developing ideas around this.

    ARGs seem to me to be a way to create authentic and engaging projects that students could immerse themselves in.

  • Avatar ImageColin, a level 2 monster with 2 posts — 1 year, 7 months ago:

    Lots of interests, but one that may be appropriate here would be an edu game focused on primary students. Something like minecraft but two tier; one tier a sandbox and a second where the students could map their actual local environment in detail. Mapping, geometry, design etc. Could generate a lot of useful data for the community, get the kids into the field with associated activities. Could extend to senior school.
    Just a thought, but I guess everyone’s got them. Maybe oneday
    Cheers
    Colin

  • Avatar ImageRoger, a level 3 monster with 3 posts — 1 year, 7 months ago:

    I’m engaged in creating classics (Greek and Latin) courses that are RPG’s in ARG wrappers, where students play as themselves, recruited by an all-powerful creator figure (the instructor) to save civilization by learning to analyze classical culture, in order to do which they must collaboratively role-play ancient Greeks and Romans.

  • Avatar ImageAlex Moseley, a level 0 monster with 2 posts — 1 year, 6 months ago:

    Hi all. I’ve designed a game-based course in Historical Research (“The Great History Conundrum”) at a UK University. It was based on my research into ARGs (although it’s not an ARG – it shares a number of elements with it.) Quick description on my blog:http://moerg.wordpress.com/2008/11/02/the-great-history-conundrum/
    I’m now working with Archaeology on both a similar game, but also on a truer ARG-like experience based around fieldtrips in Borneo. I also undertake ongoing research into the benefits of ARGs in Education.
    So, this group is right up my street :)

  • Avatar ImageAlex Gagnon, a level 1 monster with 2 posts — 1 year, 6 months ago:

    My interest is in educational ARGs that would involve web-based exploratory search plus treasure-hunt style exploration in the real world, using Augmented Reality. A simple example is you’re in a museum or gallery at a specific exhibit and there’s a challenge or mystery you must solve through both types of exploration done in tandem. The goal would be to help teach young adults how to search the web, how to find information resources, how to do web research most effectively. Also it would be great to add social elements of collaboration.. In other words, educational ARGs to help teach digital literacy to young people.. in a spirit of playfulness.

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      Randall Fujimoto · 1 year, 6 months ago· REPLY · Flag

      Hi Alex, that sounds like an excellent idea to engage people on-site at particular institutions. Have you started work on this type of project?

  • Avatar ImageJason Rosenblum, a level 7 monster with 19 posts — 1 year, 4 months ago:

    I’m working with another fellow Gameful colleague, Jen Dornan, to design a university course in global social problems that is inspired by Jane’s notions of ‘forecasting games’ and that will *loosely* employ characteristics of ARGS/Superhero gaming (as also inspired by Jane’s work).

    We’ve been brainstorming ways to have a mission-based / network-enabled / community-oriented class in which students work to address global problems @ a local scale. We want to situate learning in a way that asks students to imagine how they might work to change a ‘forecasted future’. We’re planning a variety of mission objectives that range from RL participation to writing and media creation.

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      Randall Fujimoto · 1 year, 4 months ago· REPLY · Flag

      Hi Jason, sounds like a great project. Please keep us posted here about your progress and implementation.

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        Jason Rosenblum · 1 year, 4 months ago· REPLY · Flag

        You betcha. Actually, we’d love to hear about any ideas that you might have! One of the issues we’re trying to work out is how to implement a ’scoring’ system. We’re thinking of using something similar to Evoke’s peer-based voting model, but we’re still trying to figure out how a system like that can actually work in a course environment. Ideas?

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          Simon Brookes · 1 year, 4 months ago· REPLY · Flag

          I use a bespoke built leaderboard in my ARG unit. Students get marks for responding to questions emailed to them by various characters in the story and also from peer assessed teamwork contribution. I also give-out bonus marks here and there for random acts of coolness! I’ll happily show you the system if you like.

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            Jason Rosenblum · 1 year, 4 months ago· REPLY · Flag

            That sounds like a most excellent & creative system. We’re also looking to incorporate peer assessment–and I *really* like giving props to ’random acts of coolness’. So yes, Jen & I would love to see it!

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            Randall Fujimoto · 1 year, 4 months ago· REPLY · Flag

            Simon, would you be up to doing a small, mini-webinar to show your system to people that might be interested (like me)?

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            Jen Dornan · 1 year, 4 months ago· REPLY · Flag

            I’m the co-creator on Jason’s project and I would love to see other people’s assessment/award strategies! I second a mini-webinar.

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            Simon Brookes · 1 year, 4 months ago· REPLY · Flag

            Yes happy to do some sort of webinar. Any ideas on the best way to do this?

            S

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            Jason Rosenblum · 1 year, 4 months ago· REPLY · Flag

            Can we do this on a group Skype call? Do they support group screen sharing? If not, I can check to see if SEU could host something & when (we use Elluminate).

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            Jason Rosenblum · 1 year, 3 months ago· REPLY · Flag

            Methinks we might have a solution–zipcast! Slideshare just launched a service that lets people do live webinars. You get your own meeting rooms, live vid, etc. More info @http://www.slideshare.net/zipcast . Simon, would this work for you?

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              Simon Brookes · 1 year, 3 months ago· REPLY · Flag

              Looks like a plan. I think we need to text the application though because I just tried to enter an existing conference and my browser kept crashing.

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                Jason Rosenblum · 1 year, 3 months ago· REPLY · Flag

                Just tested it today on FF v4b11 on the mac. So far so good…will keep trying.

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      Maria Droujkova · 1 year, 3 months ago· REPLY · Flag

      Simon, I will be happy to host your webinar as a part of the MathFuture series – since we have many people in the Math Game Design group who will be interested. Just let me know some times that are good for you. We use Elluminate.

      http://mathfuture.wikispaces.com/events
      http://mathfuture.wikispaces.com/GameGroup

      My email droujkova@gmail.com and Skype maria_droujkova

  • Avatar ImageSimon Brookes, a level 5 monster with 12 posts — 1 year, 3 months ago:

    It seems to be a Chrome problem with Flash – no idea why. However, I think it works OK on IE so I’m happy to give it a whirl. Any preferences on date and time?

    Simon

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      Jason Rosenblum · 1 year, 3 months ago· REPLY · Flag

      Monday the 21st or Tues the 22nd (after SXSW) would work for me. I’ll check in with Jenn to see how this fits in with her schedule.

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      Jason Rosenblum · 1 year, 3 months ago· REPLY · Flag

      Just heard back from Jenn–Monday the 21st works for both of us. Would 10am CST (GMT-5), 3pm GMT work? We can be flexible that day if we need to tweak. Who else is game? Randall, are you in?

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        Randall Fujimoto · 1 year, 3 months ago· REPLY · Flag

        Yes, I’m in! Shall we try to get others to join in (inside and outside of Gameful)? If so, we can do a little marketing for it once you establish a medium (did you want to take Maria up on Elluminate or will Zipcast work OK?). Also, if possible, pushing the time back a couple of hours might be better for any West coast participants. In any case, let me know the details and we’ll spread the word. Thanks for putting together this webinar!

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          Jason Rosenblum · 1 year, 3 months ago· REPLY · Flag

          I’m deferring to Simon as far as which platform to use. I think doing a little marketing would be great. I’ll double-check with Jenn but I’m ok with pushing the time back to either 11am or noon CST, which would be either 4pm or 5pm Simon’s time, I believe. Simon would it work for you to push it back?

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          Jason Rosenblum · 1 year, 3 months ago· REPLY · Flag

          Simon is still having problems with zipcast. Maria, would you be able to host the Webinar on Mon @ 4pm GMT / 11am CST?

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            Randall Fujimoto · 1 year, 2 months ago· REPLY · Flag

            No word from Maria? I guess the webinar will have to be rescheduled, huh? If Maria is unable to host, I can probably find a good webinar solution.

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              Simon Brookes · 1 year, 2 months ago· REPLY · Flag

              Indeed. Lets try again. It would be great sometime w/c 18th April for me (my students are on Easter break).

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              Jason Rosenblum · 1 year, 2 months ago· REPLY · Flag

              Oops, my bad. I should’ve reposted Maria & I’s private communication. She can host, but we’ll need to come up with a couple of alternatives for dates. I need to check with Jenn to see what dates might work–although the week of April 18 might work…

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              Jason Rosenblum · 1 year, 2 months ago· REPLY · Flag

              Sorry for the delay y’all :) . Mon/Wed the week of the 18th will work for us. Simon, Maria & Randall how does that work for y’all at around 11am CST / 4pm GMT?

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                Simon Brookes · 1 year, 2 months ago· REPLY · Flag

                Both are good for me friends.

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                Randall Fujimoto · 1 year, 2 months ago· REPLY · Flag

                Either day is good for me. If the time could be pushed back an hour, that would be better for me to be able to get settled at the office first. But, I can adjust if the current time works for everyone else. Thanks for getting the ball rolling again, Jason.

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                  Simon Brookes · 1 year, 2 months ago· REPLY · Flag

                  might be tricky for me Randall. I leave work at 5.15 normally and travel home with my wife.

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                Jason Rosenblum · 1 year, 2 months ago· REPLY · Flag

                Lemme check-in with Maria on her availability. Could y’all start earlier? Say 2 or 3 GMT? (9 or 10 CST)

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                  Simon Brookes · 1 year, 2 months ago· REPLY · Flag

                  I can!

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                  Jason Rosenblum · 1 year, 2 months ago· REPLY · Flag

                  I’ve heard back from Maria. However, she’s only available @ 5pm GMT that day. Scheduling around diverse timezones is definitely a challenge! Do you want to try & meet on the 18th @ 3pm GMT and do this over zipcast or skype or would you rather schedule a time over eluminate with Maria?

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                  Jason Rosenblum · 1 year, 2 months ago· REPLY · Flag

                  Randall & Simon, we need to reschedule this, I’m afraid. If anything we (St. Eds) can host this via Elluminate if zipcast isn’t an option. Are y’all available on Wed next week @ the same time?

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                    Randall Fujimoto · 1 year, 2 months ago· REPLY · Flag

                    I’m OK for next Wed (Apr 20) at 3pm GMT (11am EDT, 10am CDT, 8am PDT). Wow, this reply box sure is narrow!

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                  Jason Rosenblum · 1 year, 1 month ago· REPLY · Flag

                  Yes, Jennifer & I are also OK with this. Just need to arrange with Simon.

  • Avatar ImageMaria Droujkova, a level 7 monster with 20 posts — 1 year, 3 months ago:

    I am working on MathTrek, an ARG where groups (or individuals) go around photographing math concepts. This is based on photographer scavenger hunts, writing prompt games, and a bit on Eastern European “extreme city games.”

    We just finished the first cycle of six weekly games. You can see details here:http://naturalmath.wikispaces.com/MathTrekResearchTriangle

    I am having the hardest time keeping track of levels and achievements by hand. I would really appreciate any sort of advice for game platform software where levels are based on comments and photographs.

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      Nance Cedar · 12 months ago· REPLY · Flag

      I really like this idea. What level students are you working with?

      Viewing post 16 to 30 (34 total posts)
      • Avatar Image, a level 0 monster with 22 posts — 1 year, 3 months ago:

        I’m getting my feet wet with ARGs…trying chore wars online…reading…trying to get my head wrapped around the concept. I plan to design a small scale ARG as an experiment that would connect academic content with executive functioning support for autism spectrum kids. Wondering if anyone has worked with an ARG that can function with only one participant?

      • Avatar ImageSimon Brookes, a level 5 monster with 12 posts — 1 year, 2 months ago:

        I think it would work One to One or One to Many (well lots of evidence for the latter commercially). I see ARGs as a way of creating an authentic environment for learning so why not. Sounds cool!

      • Avatar Image, a level 0 monster with 22 posts — 1 year, 2 months ago:

        Exactly! My experience with an ASD learner is that learning goes best when embedded in a context. Maybe it’s the context that provides the executive function support. Or, maybe an ARG could be used to scaffold that kind of support so that the academic content is easier to learn. Thanks for the encouragement! :)

      • Avatar ImageAnthony Ortega, a level 4 monster with 11 posts — 1 year, 1 month ago:

        Hello all!

        I helped design and implement a small scale ARG called I Love Trees for PETE&C (Pennsylvania Educational Technology Expo & Conference) in Hershey, PA. I can’t share the website because we’re currently repurposing it to create our next small scale ARG for Harrisburg University’s LEEF (Learning & Entertainment Evolution Forum) in Harrisburg, PA.

        I can, however, provide a link (http://www.harrisburgu.net/news/article.php?id=743) and tell you that it was an experiment on our part to see how well we could create an ARG (four employees of Harrisburg University). The goal was to help educate attendees about PLP (http://plpnetwork.com/), Powerful Learning Practice; a nexus for educators to gain and share resources to enhance their classrooms and teaching experiences.

        With the relative success of I Love Trees, we are now applying our knowledge to our LEEF (http://www.goleef.com/) conference with an ARG aimed at highlighting successful people, key terms, and case studies of game design principles being introduced into the work and learning environment. Gameful’s very own Nathan Verrill is one of our keynote speakers and we’re currently researching various other types of organizations and people who are helping this movement to grow.

        With that, if anyone wants to know more or has any resources they would be interested in sharing, feel free to start a conversation with me. My focus is more on the game design and making sure that it’s a worthwhile experience for whoever decides to play, but I’m helping to gather and collect all of the resources we’ll be using for this game.

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          Randall Fujimoto · 1 year ago· REPLY · Flag

          Hi Anthony,

          Thanks for sharing the info about your I Love Trees ARG. Looks like your team put a lot of really good work into it. How were the results at the PETE&C conference? (They need to get a better name for that conference.)

          Please let us know how things go at the LEEF conference. I wish I could go to that conference but PA is so far away from southern Cal.

          Randall

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            Anthony Ortega · 1 year ago· REPLY · Flag

            I would say the PETE&C ARG was very successful for our first serious foray into ARGs. I just found out the website is still up athttp://www.ilovetrees.net if you want to check it out.

            We had the goal of having 50 players over the course of 10 days. We ended up with over 160 players, obviously with varying degrees of interaction, but over 70 of them did more than just register. After the LEEF ARG we are going to meet with PETE&C again for a 2012 ARG so that has to count for something.

      • Avatar ImagePaul Driver, a level 0 monster with 2 posts — 1 year ago:

        I’ve been experimenting with ARGs for language learners for a few years now. I came to them in my search for a better way to contextual language production in a more situated, embodied and authentic way than is possible in the classroom context. I’m interested in the roles narrative, movement, space, play and social interaction play in learning and internalizing a second language, and how an experiential and procedural approach may help and motivate learners.

        The games i’ve designed so far have combined online and offline storytelling through Facebook, Twitter and QR codes, together with real-time GPS-based play and media creation in the city centre.

        Feel free to take a peek here: http://web.me.com/paul_driver

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          Randall Fujimoto · 1 year ago· REPLY · Flag

          Hi Paul,

          Thanks for sharing info about your ARG on here. How did the game go? How many players, what were the learning objectives, and what/how did you assess?

          Randall

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            Jason Rosenblum · 1 year ago· REPLY · Flag

            This sounds like a neat game! I too am interested in learning more about this–I love the highly engaging, narrative aspect. How did the students take to the ARG format of the class?

      • Avatar ImageSven, a level 7 monster with 4 posts — 1 year ago:

        I am not entirely sure if this counts as “alternate reality” educational “game”, but currently i am working on designing a gamification project for a university course. The target is to give students extra motivation for their studies, by allowing them to earn points and badges (asides of their normal Bachelor-/Master-ECTS) by completing quests. A quest can be “visit this or that lecture”, etc. The student might earn a “i visited this event” badge and 5 points, which would enable him or her to rent a DVD from the university for a weekend. The idea is from the professor, i am designing the system for it. Will be web-based.

        So it’s not quite an “alternate reality” but more of a “gameful addition” to reality. Dose this count? ^^

      • Avatar ImageRandall Fujimoto, a level 7 monster with 79 posts — 1 year ago:

        Hi Sven,

        Thanks for sharing info about your new system. I’d say it’s more of a “gamification of the school system” instead of an actual ARG, but still sounds very cool. It sounds similar to the 3DGameLabs system developed at Boise St. that’s coming out soonhttp://3dgamelab.org.mmoguildsites.com/

        Randall

Views: 155

Replies to This Discussion

      • Avatar ImageSven, a level 7 monster with 4 posts — 1 year ago:

        Absolutely! I was looking for similar systems and ideas for about a month now and the day i join here, i get three great hints and many additional ideas for it! This is great! It is sad i didn’t find this community earlier. Thank you for the hint! I will be sure to check it out in detail =)

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          Paul Driver · 1 year ago· REPLY · Flag

          Sven/Randall, what do you think about the whole intrinsic vs extrinsic motivation issue regarding gamified educational platforms?

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            Sven · 1 year ago· REPLY · Flag

            Well, the problem of course is, principally students ”should” learn and get the motivation to learn just out of the studies they do. Yet here is a phenomenon i have been encountered with myself when i was little.
            I have been going to a private Elementary School called ”Montessori Schule” in Germany. The school does not do teacher-centered teaching, but lets their students decide what they do, how they do it and when they do it, even at their very young age. This means that you get told of course ”you need to learn math and writing and reading”, but you are free on your way to achieve it. They give you certain materials with which you learn what you have to learn. For example: You learn writing by having a letter (capital or lowercase) and you have to redraw it in the sand a couple of times while watching it. Then you have to draw it without looking at it, etc. So basically like a game.

            I have learned everything i needed to know from Elementary School to get to the German ”Gymnasium”, which is where you make your Abitur. Since we did not have grades in Montessori school either, i had to take an exam before going on and i passed it with a 1,3 which is an A.

            So since i have had this experience, i would definitely say that extrinsic motivation for educational environments is definitely not a bad thing. Of course it does not work for everyone. (It hasn’t for my brother for example, he was better after switching to a regular school with teacher-centered teaching principles) But it definitely did work for 70% of my fellow classmates at that time.

      • Avatar ImagePaul Driver, a level 0 monster with 2 posts — 1 year ago:

        Great response! To me though, your course in Germany actually sounds more playful but less game-like than traditional schooling. One of my concerns about educational gamification is that unless things are designed from the ground up to be intrinsically motivational, then what you might end up with is a game layer thinly disguising the broken and anachronistic formal structures of industrial schooling. I guess there’s an ethical issue here, in that by concealing the underlying problems you distract attention away from fixing them and help maintain the status quo.

        There’s a secondary school here in Portugal that has gamified many aspects of the system, including attendance, punctuality, discipline, delivery of homework assignments etc. and, while it has been overwhelmingly successful and improving the stats on all of these elements, if students don’t internalize the reasons for their actions, once the rewards are removed will they continue with this conditioned response?

        The question is whether the ultimate measure of a gamified system’s success should be how well students do in standardized exams. Shouldn’t it also be used as a tool to challenge what, where, how, when, and why we learn?

        I’m just being the devil’s advocate here and of course, if you can design something that engages learners and inspires them to learn for learning’s sake and take action based on what they have learned, then there is enormous potential. The problem is how?

        Btw, Have you read Juul’s Gamification Backlash Roundup?

      • Avatar ImageRandall Fujimoto, a level 7 monster with 79 posts — 1 year ago:

        Paul, your question about intrinsic vs. extrinsic motivation is a good one and is one that has many game designers “up in arms” about this new movement to gamify everything. I agree with you that, in the end, a successful system (gamified or not) has to eventually show the user how the learning itself is intrinsically motivating. If the (gamified) system uses extrinsic rewards to push the user into seeing the intrinsic benefits of the learning, then it’s worthwhile. Otherwise, it’s just fluff.

        Re: success being tied to standardized exams, here’s a good article that talks about the goals of education and how the current standardized testing educational system we have today is not fulfilling the true purpose of education:http://www.dreamscape7.com/2010/08/lets-talk-about-education.

        My thoughts are that gamified educational systems should come up with ways to promote learning skills (by promoting collaboration, creativity, etc.) instead of just focusing on content standards (e.g., points for getting a math problem right). I’d like to design a system (if it’s not already out there) that allows the instructor to award points (and feedback) on every discussion board post that students make so that it will encourage high quality feedback (and thus more critical thinking). Hmm, maybe they can add this someday to the Gameful forums here (so I can maybe get a +1 on this post!).

        Randall

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          Jason Rosenblum · 1 year ago· REPLY · Flag

          +1, Randall.

          The issue motivation is really key. Game mechanics are really useful, but aren’t inherently enough. The ’gamification’ movement works, I think for systems that involve money–after all money is a great motivator (I literally heard someone @ SXSW say that they *wanted* to be gamed in this way)! But, I think (again getting back to Jane’s ideas) that the issue is really about making a difference–re: relevance. In this case, how is the activity being ”gamified” relevant to learners in their life? The question I think isn’t how to gamify homework and what might be the beneifts, rather what do we want learners to get out of doing homework in the first place? How does that learning relate to their life? I think if we can start there–with the issue of relevance–then ’gamifying’ then just becomes the mechanics for how to build some structure around that experience. But, overall I think we should try to drive the discussion to the larger issue of how to create more gameful approaches to learning that makes learning a meaningful, satisfying event–not just a method to game points.

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          Ted Wong · 1 year ago· REPLY · Flag

          Here’s another way to express this idea of focusing gamification on skills and habits rather than on the primary content of the course. I’ve been reading a lot lately about the difficulty of changing people’s behavior by making arguments. The idea is that you can’t change behaviors by trying to adjust people’s attitudes; people adopt behaviors, and they adjust their attitudes to fit those behaviors. (Nice overview athttp://www.grist.org/article/2010-11-23-behavior-change-causes-chan....) Here’s where games can be very useful. Games get people to take on behaviors, if temporarily, for explicitly artificial reasons. Gameplayers feel safe adopting those behaviors because everyone knows they’re artificial — and if the game feels fun and safe, gameplayers can adopt those behaviors enthusiastically, with all the attendant endorphin rushes, etc. If the game works well, then previously alien behaviors can feel more natural outside the game, and might even adjust a habit or two.

          So it doesn’t bother me that the games I want to create rely largely on extrinsic motivators. My students need to pick up some good habits — intellectual habits as well as life-management habits. (I work in a large urban community college with an enormous population of remedial students.) As long as the game mechanics involve some habits that will benefit them in traditional, gameless classes — and here, I’m thinking of things like forming study groups, asking questions in class, looking things up in textbooks and online — they’ll become better learners.

          • Avatar Image
            Randall Fujimoto · 1 year ago· REPLY · Flag

            Hi Ted,

            Thank you for your thoughts on this topic and for sharing the interesting article about behavior and attitudes. It seems to me that this is more of a behaviorist’s approach to using games (like getting the dog to ring the bell for food), which is not necessarily a bad thing if, as you say, it results in a good change of attitudes.

            However, I’d like to think there are also good ways to gamify an educational system in more of a cognitivist or constructivist manner, where players’ thought processes and intrinsic motivators are important. It’s just a lot more difficult to do this, but I think it would be worthwhile to research (ideas anyone?).

            In any case, thanks for adding your thoughts to this very interesting discussion.

            Randall

      • Avatar ImageSteve Radabaugh, a level 4 monster with 4 posts — 1 year ago:

        I’m looking at adding some game elements to my High School Graphic Design class. I want to start by putting in achievement points (a la xbox live). Something like, once a student finishes a project using layers they get the “Layer Master” badge with 20 points.

        This is me getting my feet wet. I’d like to implement an ARG. I’ve been in love with them ever since I played “The Beast” tie in game with “AI”. But that’s a ways down the road.

        What I would LOVE to see, is some sort of open framework that teachers can use to track things like stats, quests, achievements in their classes. I’m not sure yet how I’m going to display to the students what achievements they have gotten, and where they stand on the scoreboard. I don’t’ have time to build an application like that by myself, but I’d love to collaborate with a group of people to make one.

      • Avatar ImageSara Raasch, a level 0 monster with 2 posts — 9 months, 3 weeks ago:

        I worked to design educational and training ARGs while working on my Masters Degree at Georgia Tech, while I’m not currently working on any games, I designed an ARG to motivate players to help stop global warming for my thesis. I’m interested in seeing where other people take the concept and how large mainstream ARGs and their designs influence serious games.

      • Avatar ImageMike Skocko, a level 7 monster with 1 posts — 9 months, 3 weeks ago:

        Randall, thanks for starting this thread and for your comments on intrinsic vs. extrinsic motivation and promoting learning skills. +1

        Steve, I applaud your efforts to add game elements to your Graphic Design class. I teach high school as well — digital arts, 3D, multimedia, etc. — and am attempting to gamify the whole upcoming year. In a nutshell:

        Rather than assignments, students will embark on Quests, earning Experience Points, Leveling Up, and eventually earning creative freedom in choosing a profession that fits their wants and needs: animator, illustrator, graphic designer, digital publisher, photographer, videographer, etc. (Think WoW.) They’ll have the opportunity to embark on multi-player Quests (student-directed collaboration) and initiate their own Quests, like cross-curricular projects, formal student mentoring, commercial work, etc.
        – full details at http://maclab.guhsd.net/blog/?p=27701

        The biggest challenge (besides redesigning the curriculum to fit the ARG) is the scoring system. Since there’s virtually no chance of finding a customizable engine to facilitate scoring in the next few days (or is there?), the current plan is to use an LMS but that seems less than optimal. I do, however like the idea of students self-assessing to earn their XP.

        Does anyone have a better/different idea to efficiently keep and track scores? If there’s a solution that could be incorporated directly into our WordPress site, that would be a dream come true.

        FULL DISCLOSURE: I’m such a noob that I didn’t even know what an ARG was until encountering the term in Jane’s book a couple of weeks ago.

        Wishing everyone else the best with your own ARG adventures!

      • Avatar ImageJack Shuttleworth, a level 2 monster with 3 posts — 6 months ago:

        I work at a museum, gallery, archive, with its own roman fort and a fantastic commitment to making our collections come alive for everyone from 3 year olds to academics and refugees. I think the diversity of stuff – mediaeval theatre masks to contemporary art invites narratives and weird connections which suit ARGs.

        So far just exploring!

      • Avatar ImageCarrie Cole, a level 0 monster with 3 posts — 6 months ago:

        I’m a graduate student studying serious game design (including board games and digital games). My first semester has consisted of designing both a serious board game and an entertainment digital game. Something a few of my classmates and I have been thinking about is trying to design a meaningful ARG together. It’s something to consider for people who want to design games but do not have a strong background in programming languages or art. Not to mention it’s also a great group activity for both the designers and the players!

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          Randall Fujimoto · 6 months ago· REPLY · Flag

          Hi Carrie, yes it’d be a great experience for you and your classmates to design an educational ARG. And you’re right, you don’t need these super technical or artistic skills – or even a lot of money to make a good one. Good luck, and please keep us posted on here about your progress.

          –Randall

          Viewing post 31 to 34 (34 total posts)
  • Avatar ImageJason Rosenblum, a level 7 monster with 19 posts — 6 months ago:

    Hello everyone! It’s been several months since I checked into this forum, but I wanted to give everyone an update on my game-based course that I started to design last spring. The name of the class is Global Social Problems: Local Action and Social Networks for change: http://academic.stedwards.edu/globalsocialproblems.

    I designed the course over the summer and launched it this fall. The course is designed based on Jane’s superhero-style approach in Evoke. Over the term, students worked to address a large-scale global social issue through Research and Action. We made heavy use of social media, and incorporated a peer-review system as a way to assign “Character Trait” points in each of 10 key course values. We also implemented a superhero-themed badge based profile system that was based on point earnings.

    If you want to know more about the class, feel free to check out a recent presentation on the topic @ http://slidesha.re/rsyQAu or ping me.

    –Jason

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      Randall Fujimoto · 6 months ago· REPLY · Flag

      Very cool Jason – thanks for sharing. Would you be interested in doing a webinar about this? I started a new Gameful Webinar Series and I think this would be a great presentation to hear.

      –Randall

  • Avatar ImageJason Rosenblum, a level 7 monster with 19 posts — 6 months ago:

    Yes, a webinar sounds like a great idea. Let’s coordinate on logistics. I’ll also bring my co-instructor for the class into the loop as well. Do you have a timeframe in mind?

  • Avatar ImageSimon Brookes, a level 5 monster with 12 posts — 6 months ago:

    This looks awesome Jason. I’d also like an invite to the webinar please Randall.

    • Avatar Image
      Randall Fujimoto · 6 months ago· REPLY · Flag

      Hey Simon, yes I’ll be sure to post a link to the webinar. Would you be interested in doing another one?

  • Avatar ImageFusion Energy League, a level 2 monster with 1 posts — 3 months, 1 week ago:

    Hi All! Fusion Energy League here, a nonprofit. (Me, Rezwan). We’ve got a games section – http://www.fusionenergyleague.org/index.php/blog/category/C12 but nothing there leaps out as an ARG.

    However, there is one thing which I filed under “food” but which seems appropriate here: Alternative Energy Futures Cookbook:http://www.fusionenergyleague.org/index.php/blog/article/pursue_fus...

Sorry this discussion was so long that I had to paste it in several chunks. SB

I'm currently planning an educational ARG for university-level computer science education. The main idea is that the ARG would not be part of any official curriculum and therefore participating would be voluntary (no study credits). So, obviously, one of the main challenges will be to get enough students to join. The game will take place partly online and partly on campus, so people can also participate even if they don't live in the same country. The game will launch in the beginning of 2013.

The game is not part of any curriculum, but the idea is that the puzzles in the ARG require similar skills that are taught in our computer science courses, like: programming, algorithm design and implementation, data structures, data mining… I have a work-in-progress poster about this in the European Conference on Games Based Learning in October. If anyone happens to be there, I would be happy to meet you.

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